FIRST ON KNIGHTNEWS.COM AT 2:30 P.M.
The Orange-Osceola County Medical Examiner’s Office has confirmed to KnightNews.com the manner of Ann Hefferin’s death was “natural” — and was caused by a bacterial infection.

Information that some sort of a bacterial infection caused Hefferin’s death was communicated by UCF administrators to Greek leaders this afternoon, KnightNews.com has learned.


READ THE MEDICAL EXAMINER’S PRESS RELEASE ON ANN HEFFERIN’S DEATH


Ann Hefferin on Homecoming Court

A press release from the medical examiner’s office identifies the exact cause of death as follows: “Sepsis syndrome, due to Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus) bacteremia.” Bacteremia occurs when there is bacteria in the bloodstream, and is known more commonly as “blood poisoning” by those outside of the medical community, according to medicinenet.com.


The medical examiner’s office has so far declined to release the full autopsy report, telling KnightNews.com the full autopsy report is not available at this time.

The medical examiner’s statement indicates toxicology testing confirmed a “trace” amount of alcohol was detected in her fluids, along with the drug naproxen (it didn’t specify if it was the prescription drug or an over-the-counter version) and caffeine within her blood.

ALCOHOL BAN ALMOST LIFTED IN RECENT VOTE AT GREEK COUNCIL

We’re working to gather much more information and reaction from the Greek community as to how this could impact the unprecedented ban on alcoholic events in Greek Life. KnightNews.com has obtained public records that show half of the councils sitting on the board recently voted to lift the alcohol ban during a Sept. 9 meeting.

Greek Council Almost Lifts Alcohol Ban, Read 9/9 Minutes
The councils representing traditionally minority Greeks, NPHC and DGC, were the ones which voted in favor of overturning the ban. IFC and Panhellenic, representing traditionally caucasian Greek organizations, along with an “at-large member” hand-picked by a UCF administrator, overrode the movement to lift the ban by a vote of 2-3.

In a Sept. 12 email Greek Student Involvement Director Anthony Perry sent to his colleagues, he discussed push-back over the alcohol ban from minority councils in the Greek community.

“I don’t consider this a legal matter, but the legal concepts of ‘disparate treatment’ and ‘disparate impact’ exist on some level with this,” Perry wrote in the email. “Some students may be headed that way based upon what I’ve seen and heard.”

On Sept. 23, minutes show the Greek Council hosted another meeting where major changes to the moratorium were made. A vote passed unanimously which authorized organizations to now seek permission to host alcohol events, which would then be evaluated on a case-by-case basis before OFSL approval is given.

Check back for more details as soon as we get them.

Read the press release from the Medical Examiner’s Office on the next page.